(Pain)ful Facts

Back Pain Facts & Statistics

#1:
Almost 80% of Americans will have back problems at some point in their life. (1)

#2:
The most common form is in the lower back, which at times can result in disabling episodes. (2)

#3:
The CDC’s research, based on household interviews amongst the civilian population, found that nearly a third of the female adult population suffered from LBP, compared to a quarter of the male adult population. (3)

#4:
Approximately half of all pregnant women will have significant complaints of backache, according to research from the University of Michigan. (4)

#5:
According to the APTA Move Forward survey, in which over 2600 respondents shared their experiences and habits regarding back pain, 39% of adults reported that LBP prevents them from fully engaging in daily life tasks. (5)

#6:
Sleep quality is reduced for those who with chronic pain, with more than half stating that they suffer from poor sleep quality. (6)

#7:
Back pain is no longer for those who spend the majority of the day on their feet. Cases in one study proved that 54% of Americans experiencing pain spend most of their workday sitting. (7)

#8:
Back pain is no longer for those who spend the majority of the day on their feet. Cases in one study proved that 54% of Americans experiencing pain spend most of their workday sitting. (8)

#9:
Back pain is no longer for those who spend the majority of the day on their feet. Cases in one study proved that 54% of Americans experiencing pain spend most of their workday sitting. (9)

#10:
Back pain is no longer for those who spend the majority of the day on their feet. Cases in one study proved that 54% of Americans experiencing pain spend most of their workday sitting. (10)

#11:
Back pain is no longer for those who spend the majority of the day on their feet. Cases in one study proved that 54% of Americans experiencing pain spend most of their workday sitting. (11)

#12:
Not only is there a rapid increase in the number of physicians’ visits for back pain, but a larger proportion of the population is affected. (12)

#13:
Nine out of ten people who seek medical treatment for their back do not find out the primary cause of their pain. (13)

#14:
This is because there are many factors contributing to the likelihood of pain, such as physical activities, but this association is not equivalent to the causation of back pain. (14)

#15:
Chiropractic treatments were proven to be effective for just over 50% of suffers, as noted in the Research!America survey conducted in 2003. (15)

#16:
The chiropractic industry is significant in the US with over 45,000 licensed chiropractors generating combined annual revenue of $12 billion. (16)

#17:
Chiropractic treatment is not isolated to the US. Tens of millions of people around the world visit one of the 95,000 actively practicing chiropractic doctors for their backs. (17)

#18:
The types of treatment options available to sufferers have mixed reviews. Physical therapy is another standard treatment, and was rated effective by 48% of people. (18)

#19:
Surgery is a more serious treatment option, and is only necessary for five percent of the 56 million Americans seeking relief for their pain. (19)

#20:
Of the people who receive surgery, 5.4 people in 10 believe it to be effective. (20)

#21:
When it comes to spinal surgeries, the most common type is discectomies, which is the removal of the herniated part of a disc. Operations that involve the joining of surrounding vertebrae, better known as spinal fusions, have been rising. There were just over 150,000 surgeries in 1993, and by 2007 the number had more than doubled to 350,754. (21)

#22:
Even though the number of spinal fusions has been on the rise, experts estimate that fewer than half of them are appropriate and research confirms that the same proportion are successful. (22)

#23:
60-80% of patients experience the same issues within two years of first reporting a problem. (23)

#24:
For people whose pain last more than three months, or twelve weeks, many authors define them as having chronic symptoms.

#25:
Persistent pain develops into chronic back pain in up to 7% of patients.

 

 

 

  1. Sayre, C. (2011) America Asks About Back Pain. [Online] Available from: http://www.webmd.com/back-pain/america-asks-13/12-back-pain-tips [Accessed 13 April 2017].
  2. Chiodo, A. E. et al (2011) Acute Low Back Pain. [Online] Available from: http://www.med.umich.edu/1info/FHP/practiceguides/back/back.pdf [Accessed 13 April 2017].
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014) Health, United States, 2014. [Online] Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/2014/046.pdf [Accessed 13 April 2017].
  4. Chiodo, A. E. et al (see footnote 2)
  5. American Physical Therapy Association (2012) Most Americans Live with Low Back Pain – and Don’t Seek Treatment. [Online] Available from: http://www.apta.org/Media/Releases/Consumer/2012/4/4/ [Accessed 13 April 2017].
  6. Mäntyselkä, P. (2012) Sleeping with pain—A nightmare. [Online] Available from: http://www.scandinavianjournalpain.com/article/S1877-8860(12)00156-5/fulltext [Accessed 13 April 2017].
  7. American Physical Therapy Association (see footnote 5)
  8. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (2012) Decision Memo for Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Chronic Low Back Pain. [Online] Available from: https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/details/nca-decision-memo.aspx?NCAId=256 [Accessed 13 April 2017].
  9. American Physical Therapy Association (see footnote 5)
  10. Chiodo, A. E. et al (see footnote 2)
  11. Rapaport, L. (2015) Early physical therapy might help ease lower back pain. [Online] Available from: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-backpain-early-pt-idUSKCN0S82H520151014 [Accessed 13 April 2017].
  12. The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States (2015) Burden of Back Pain. [Online] Available from: http://www.boneandjointburden.org/2014-report/iid0/burden-back-pain [Accessed 13 April 2017].
  13. American Academy of Family Physicians (2007) Nonspecific Low Back Pain and Return to Work. [Online] Available from: http://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/1115/p1497.html [Accessed 13 April 2017].
  14. American Academy of Family Physicians (see footnote 13)
  15. Peter D. Hart Research Associates (2003) Americans Talk About Pain. [Online] Available from: http://www.researchamerica.org/sites/default/files/uploads/poll2003pain.pdf [Accessed 13 April 2017].
  16. First Research (2016) Chiropractors Industry Profile. [Online] Available from: http://www.firstresearch.com/Industry-Research/Chiropractors.html [Accessed 13 April 2017].
  17. International Chiropractors Association (2016) Facts About Chiropractic. [Online] Available from: http://www.chiropractic.org/content.asp?contentid=157 [Accessed 13 April 2017].
  18. Peter D. Hart Research Associates (see footnote 15)
  19. Hope, T. and Ince, S. (2009) The Truth About Back Surgery. [Online] Available from: http://www.orthopaedicsurgery.uci.edu/pdf/rosengoodhousekeeping.pdf [Accessed 13 April 2017].
  20. Peter D. Hart Research Associates (see footnote 15)
  21. Hope, T. and Ince, S. (see footnote 19)
  22. Hope, T. and Ince, S. (see footnote 19)
  23. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (2014) Back Pain Fact Sheet. [Online] Available from: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/backpain/detail_backpain.htm [Accessed 13 April 2017].
  24. American Chiropractic Association (2017) Back Pain Facts and Statistics. [Online] Available from: https://www.acatoday.org/Patients/Health-Wellness-Information/Back-Pain-Facts-and-Statistics [Accessed 2 November 2017].
  25. Chiodo, A. E. et al (see footnote 2)